A Leicestershire field trip

Below is brief selection of sites in an understudied County, Leicestershire. Extracted from the forthcoming volume

AB KETTLEBY

Ab Kettleby Holy Well, note the grill over the following water.

In a lane close by the church, is a conical so called Holy Well (SK 724 229) although any history concerning the site is unclear. The spring is still very active although access to the water is not possible as the basin has been removed and placed on top of this truncated pyramidical yellow stone structure and the chamber is now grated. The water is said to be good for rheumatism, but beyond this little is known.

CHURCH LANGTON

St Anne’s Well, chalybeate staining at the springhead.

St Anne’s Well, the pool filled by the springhead

St Anne’s Well (SP 728 938) of which Nichols (1795-1815) notes:

“About a quarter of a mile North of the church, near the public road leading towards Staunton Wyvile, is an excellent well, or spring, called St Anne’s or Saddington’s Well, which in dry seasons has frequently been found highly serviceable… At the time of the inclosure, this spring was carefully preserved.”

Easily found and still marked on the appropriate OS map, the spring is found just by the roadside in a small copse but now directly flowing onto it. The water arises in a small bricked area and flows into a large pool. The water appears to be mildly chalybeate, as there is some sign of iron-red staining.

HOLWELL

The Holwell spring head.

 Nichols (1795–1815) notes that the parish had:

“a famous chalybeate spring, or spa, called Holwell Mouth (SK 738 236), which is considered as serviceable in many distempers; whence it obtained the name of Holy-well.”

 Despite this it is probably derived from O.E hol for ‘hollow’. It is reported that at some time the area was improved and a stone table was set up there. This may be connected with the fact that the land was called Well Dole and was granted to Vicarage 1403 and paid 10s p/a paid in 1790s for its upkeep. Was the table used to provide a dole? Otherwise would it not be a stone seat? The site was much frequented until the landowner discouraged its use and the site is still on private land but visible, more so in winter, from the footpath. However the spring currently is very overgrown but the spring head still gushes out at some speed among the foliage but quickly forms a boggy morass just off a footpath.

RATBY

Ratby Holy Well note some ancient walling?

The Holy Well (SK 502 056) is first noted by Nichols (1795-1815) notes in reference to Bury Camp above the site:

“Not far from the encampment is a place called Holywell; the water antiscorbutic.”

Its association with Bury Camp suggests it may have had some significance, possibly ritual, but certainly function although the inhabitants would have had a long walk down! Richardson (1931) describes it as:

“a good spring, “never been known to freeze”…has been piped into a now well-kept pond in the grounds of Holy Well House.”

The spring is tapped at its source, but still fills a wall lined pool to the left hand side of the house. The wall is appears to be made from local slate and may be of some age, but it is difficult to date. The water then flows into a brook. Sadly, no one was in when I visited. I made a couple of photos and left a note..no reply yet.

TUR LANGTON

 used by kind permission of, Bob Trubshaw, from his Interactive Little-known Leicestershire and Rutland CD-ROM.

King Charles Well, used by kind permission of, Bob Trubshaw, from his Interactive Little-known Leicestershire and Rutland CD-ROM.

In the middle of a field is the interestingly named King Charles’s Well or Carles Trough (SP 722 949). This appears first noted by Nichols (1795-1810). The spring fills a large trough as the name implies and appears to be chalybeate in nature. Local legend tells how Charles I watered horse here after Naseby. John Wilsons (1870-72) in his Imperial Gazetteer noted:

“Charles I., in his flight from the battle of Naseby, watered his horse here, at a place still called King Charles’ Well.”

However, it is more probable that this is a back derivation as it appears to be a back derivation from ceorl. The well is easily found along a footpath from the village.

About pixyledpublications

Currently researching calendar customs and folklore of Nottinghamshire

Posted on July 19, 2014, in Folklore, Gazatteer, Leicestershire, Pilgrimage, Saints, Well hunting and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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