Monthly Archives: August 2021

Did St. Patrick visit the Lake District? St Patrick’s Well, Patterdale

In Charles Hope’s 1893 Legendary lore of Holy wells St Patrick’s Well Patterdale is the only site mentioned twice in both Cumbria and Westmorland:

“PATTERDALE: ST. PATRICK’S WELL: St. Patrick’s Well is situated near the chapel in Patterdale.

PATTERDALE : ST. PATRICK’S WELL: As Saint Patrick passed down this beautiful valley he is said to have founded the church and blessed the well. Thus we have St. Patrick’s church and St. Patrick’s well to this day, the ancient name of the valley being Patrickdale.

For many centuries the Holy Well was used for the purposes of baptism.- — Rev. J. Wilson.”

St Patrick in Cumbria?

As Hope notes St Patrick passed by but how? A local tradition tells that he was shipwrecked off the south Cumbria coast and the local people here looked after him. The earliest reference appears to be Nicolson & Burn in their 1777  The History and Antiquities of the Counties of Westmorland and Cumberland, who say:

 “so called probably from St Patrick, to whom the chapel seems to be dedicated… and nigh unto the chapel is a well called St Patrick’s well”.

The Rev W.P Morris wrote in 1903

“During his short stay here he caused a church to be built (probably of wood) and that he also baptised a number of the inhabitants at a well, and the district was afterwards known as Patrickdale”

Is it a back derivation?

The name was recorded as Patrichesdale, meaning ‘Patrick’s Valley’, in 1184 but equally this apparently refers to a twelfth-century landownwer and at some point the saint was attached. Certainly by 1787 the name had stuck as it appears as St Patrick’s Well appears on Clarke’s map of the Lakes. So despite attempts of topographers and cartographers it probably has very little to do with the saint. There is a record of a cappella de Patricdale in 1348 which may have confused the issue.

May be an image of outdoors

However, in his Confessio St Patrick states that he was brought up in Britain in a place called Bannaven Taburniae. Here his father was a deacon and grandfather a priest and from here he was kidnapped by raiders and sold into slavery.  This Bannaven Taburniae has not been identified but of course it could be in Cumbria. The evidence being that the saint was taken to Ireland suggesting a west coast location and looking at the name it could be Birdoswald on Hadrian’s Wall or Glannoventa where substantial bath house ruins remain near Ravenglass which is even nearer. So it is possible.

The well today

The well is one of the most substantial in Cumbria being a small stone building with a pointed roof akin to a small chapel made of grey stone with a slate roof. The well was dry when I visited but apparently it is more often full of water especially in the spring and summer. Fr John Musther’s in his 2017 Springs of Living Water states that the water had healing properties. The constructor of the well is not known but it is evidently some local estate owner. The Rev Morris stated that it was constructed in the 18th Century to satisfy the “idle curiosity of visitors” and did not think it was in the correct location. Dry or otherwise if you can manage the road and the visitors it is a delightful find in the Lake district.

The healing wells of Ashover, Derbyshire

The hydrolatic history in this small village is very interesting with two hydros and a number of
noted healing springs. The first noted by Binnall (1940) was St. or Sir William‟s Well (SK 349
637) but this is perhaps not a holy well at all. The name may have changed at the Reformation
although local historian Mr. Banks, believes it was probably named after a local benefactor, the
saint prefix being as an error of the ordnance surveyors. Its only mention is in reference to the
conversion of the school in a 1830s Charity Commission report. It has now been culverted away
and was at the junction of Malthouse Lane and the land leading up to the hillside, probably when
the houses were built here in the 1970s.

More significant is Cripton Well (SK 345 638) which lies on Cripton Lane and was said to have healthgiving properties and indeed despite an area surrounded by other springs was much frequented by the hydro residents. It arises beneath some old moss covered stonework and first fills a small circular basin. Its water was said to never run dry and produces a considerable
flow joining a small brook. Does its name refer to St. Crispin or local family?

There is a field name recording Nan‟s Well, first in 1842 Tithe Award when it is noted as Nan‟s Well
Close. Nan is often a vulgarisation of St. Anne, the grandmother of Jesus. This would apparently
be the same as the Old Woman‟s Well (SK 348 627) noted in 1900 on the O/S map. The name
may also record a pagan deity (there are similarly dedicated wells especially in Yorkshire). The
O/S still shows the site but marked as a spring. However, field work failed to locate the exact
site as the area has become mudded by cattle and lost.

The Chalybeate Spa (SK 343 633) still exists being found as a rather muddy area along a
footpath just at the edge of Marsh brook. There is very little to see but a ferruginous deposit in
some of the puddles where the footpath crosses the brook on a stone slab. It is a very
insignificant site no even discernable as a spring. It was drunk for medicinal purposes in the 18th
and 19th centuries, the site being noted by Short (1734). A local legend states that it ran faster at
night than day. Whether there was any structure here is unclear it does now look very appetising!

Confusingly another spring called Bath Spring (SK344644) was used in the early 1700s and a
house was established nearby now Bath House Farm. The venture appears to have been
unsuccessful and what apparently was the spring is an inaccessible boggy hole.